Join these digital leaders

Child's drawing: stick people. One says "I've had an idea". The other says "I have too". Both have lightbulbs above their heads!

Digital teams going the extra mile to share their knowledge.

I love our sector. We do so well to connect and learn from each other. From attending meet-ups, mentoring and shadowing, or learning from hashtags or other people’s top takeaways from events, there are lots of free ways we can share and learn from each other.

Must reads

One of my go-to sources of knowledge and inspiration are the hubs of big charity digital teams. These include:

I regularly include their posts and links in my monthly round-ups as they are so useful. As well as an excuse to peep in at the window of these big charities, the shared thinking and best practice is good food for thought for us all. Posts can prompt discussion, collaboration and new ideas.

There are quite a lot of councils and other public sector blogs from digital teams around too. For example:

Benefits to the team

Although producing the posts and curating the accounts can be time-consuming, the task brings other benefits.

  • Team building – done collaboratively, creating posts about projects can help the team to reflect and review the work they are doing. In busy teams, it is easy to move on to the next task, project, crisis with no time to review or think about how to share successes, challenges or failure with others. Creating a culture of review and sharing can help to give space for reflection and improvement.
  • Knowledge sharing and skills development – if members of the team read each other’s posts, it can help them to learn from each other and appreciate stresses and demands. This can drive better future projects.
  • Internal comms – content can help non-digital internal colleagues to understand the processes and thinking behind digital projects. If writing for a non-digital audience, it can be good practice for team members to be more careful about the terminology used in their posts, cutting out the jargon too. Posts can be repurposed for internal channels.
  • Profile raising – well-shared posts can help to raise the profile of the digital teams, helping with future recruitment. Who wouldn’t want to work in a team doing cutting-edge work?
  • Creativity – a blog gives the freedom to be creative, finding different ways to share knowledge. It feels nice to do the thinking around a topic, write it up (or draw pictures or make a video) and share it. A blog can be colourful and fun showing the personality of the writer and team. And no-one gets bored of seeing photos of post-its (do they?).

colourful post-its used in content planning

So do follow / subscribe to these accounts.

Better still, start your own team’s blog to share your processes, successes and failures. We can all learn from them.

Your top tips

Are there other blogs or Twitter feeds run by digital teams you’d recommend? Have you contributed to your team blog? Any top tips for making it work? Do you have a content calendar or a blog owner who manages / edits it?

Please share in the comments.

 

<Headline image drawn by my son, found on my desk recently!>

Can I help you?

Get in touch if I can help you with digital comms, content planning, training or strategy. I work with charities of all shapes and sizes. Can I help give your comms or digital processes a healthcheck or ideas injection?

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3 thoughts on “Join these digital leaders

  1. thanks madeleine for a really good round up of digital knowledge sharing. at NSPCC we chose to make a team profile (@theDigitalDunk twitter and blog) for all the reasons you mentioned. we were inspired by others in the sector that we’ve learned from, and felt by documenting our ongoing journey we could help ourselves and help others both internally (via our intranet) and externally (via medium).

    the digital team embraced the idea from the moment i pitched it. we asked for volunteers to suggest ideas for future blogs they might like to write, brainstorm the name, develop an editorial calendar and define a style and tone of voice guide. the team decided on a 4-week rotating cycle of themes and the @theDigitalDunk was born ! doing this is absolutely not mandatory. not everyone in the digital team has time to volunteer, and contributors will vary over time.

    the one extra benefit to those you mentioned is that our blog allows our own mix of people and personalities to come through. in a big complex charity where we work on all types of campaigns for different parts of organisation that’s not possible or appropriate.

    we’re really excited by the positive feedback we’ve received so far. Keep on Dunkin’ !!

  2. Great overview Madeleine. I tend to concentrate on the needs of smaller charities in my business and with my monthly ebulletin Digital WM News but as you know I also run the unconference VCSSCamp for CVSs so I am involved in digital transformation at several levels. It’s a great time to be involved in the sector and great to know others like you who ‘get’ digital

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