Charity content round-up

It’s been another bumper week for interesting charity content. Here’s my round-up.

In my previous post I looked at using rocur to share lived experience. This week the amazing @nhs Twitter account reached new heights by live tweeting an operation! It was a brilliant way of giving an insight into a hidden world and raising awareness about the teamwork of the NHS. You can see a selection of the tweets in their operation Moment.

@nhs live tweet a bowel cancer operation

The patient was clearly ok with the profile and a quote from him was tweeted the next day thanking everyone for their good wishes. Hopefully bowel cancer charities can use the event to raise awareness about the condition and to reassure others about to go through the same treatment.

There was some nice content around for Pancake Day including this brilliant video from the National Trust.

series of people flipping pancakes to each other in different NT settings

See more pancake content in this charity Pancake Day Moment.

A ‘highlight’ of every parents year is World Book Day. The Woodland Trust produced a helpful guide to wildlife related book costumes.

tweet with image of a cardboard Stick Man

If you are a parent of a young child, this new Gruffalo Spotter App from the Forestry Commission looks amazing.

On a different note, we are seeing more stories about hidden homelessness. Buzzfeed shared short stories from people sofa surfing or squatting. This BBC news video illustrates rural rough sleeping in Cornwall.

The Guardian have produced a guide on How you can help refugees and asylum seekers in Britain which gathers many organisations working in this area. One charity not included is Refuweegee, a new Glasgow-based charity who encourage their supporters to write welcome messages like this one. You can read about their start-up lessons on the Zurich Insurance charity blog.

welcome message to refugee arriving in Glasgow

Good reads / listens

What did you spot?

What were your content highlights or good reads of the week? Do share….

January’s charity content highlights

Come out from underneath your desk / duvet and catch up with some of the latest creative charity content.

L-R Dave the Parkinsons Worm, contactless giving Zurich Insurance post, Street Support video, National Lottery gif

Innovation

Cancer Research are continuing their trend of using World Cancer Day (this Saturday – 4 February) to launch new uses for contactless fundraising. Ten ‘smart benches’ across two London boroughs will take £2 donations.

Are you planning to look in to contactless fundraising in 2017? NSPCC recently announced impressive results of their contactless fundraising and many other organisations are using it too. I gathered some examples of contactless giving in my blog post for Zurich Insurance and spoke to Haven House Children’s Hospice who are running trials at the moment.

Not sure what the technical term for this is but the National Lottery did a very smart bit of Twittering by launching this 7second video and inviting people to RT it ‘for a surprise’. The surprise was a personalised video, with the RTers’ Twitter profile image in a gold frame, with the words ‘National Treasure’ underneath. Nice! This was similar to a thanks reply from Save the Children I got in December.

National Lottery video of interesting doors / walls

Today it is Time to Talk Day (#timetotalk). Why not use Time to Change’s template to make your own graphic?

Time to Change's interactive graphic maker

Good reads

If you get a moment, don’t forget to fill in the Charity Digital Skills Survey which is open until 17 February.

And follow #smex17 on Monday if you are not going to the Social Media Exchange in person.

Re-brands / new websites / charity content

Action for Children's error message - cheeky boy with magnifying glass

To brighten your day

Meme of badly drawn pictures 'pasted' on top of a video of Donald Trump's policy signings

What have you seen?

What have been your charity content highlights from January? Do share! I’d love to hear from you.

Nonprofit digital advent calendars – tips and examples

Digital advent calendars can be a great way to drive engagement during December. If you have 24 pieces of content, why not package them up? You don’t have to produce a slick clickable website, an image shared on social media is perfect. Think about how to use your existing digital assets and a theme to give your followers a treat every day. It’s been a hard year and we all need cheering up afterall.

Examples from WCHP, MS Society, Royal Marsden, New Mills Food Bank, Bliss, Bookstart, Family Holiday Association

If you are thinking about doing an online advent calendar, here are some questions you should ask.

Does an advent calendar fit with your brand?

How will your supporters respond to a daily offering? Do you get much interaction from your every-day communications? Look at your stats and find out what type of content works best. A daily treat could inspire interaction if there hasn’t been any or could attract new audiences. Or could do annoy people.

An advent calendar might be too flippant for your cause. This depends to some extent on your tone of voice. If you have a serious cause, it is possible. See this example from Bliss who are sharing stories via their calendar (see also #blissadvent on Twitter).

Can you sustain it?

24 days is a long time to do one thing.

How can you maintain momentum over 24 days? Avoid a slump in the middle by planning your content carefully. What existing content could you use and what would you need to produce from scratch? Can you link in with other big days in December?

Do you have the resources to publish and respond to comments over a whole month including weekends and into the holidays? You can schedule posts via publishing tools such as Hootsuite but will need to keep an eye on responses.

If you don’t the energy or resources to cover 24 days, you could scale down to use the 12 days of Christmas instead? See this from the Imperial War Museum.

Should you have a theme or goal?

It can be useful to have a theme to focus your activities. Themes nonprofits have used include:

  • inspirational quotes
  • thank you’s to supporters
  • competitions and special offers
  • fundraising stories and tips
  • successes over the year
  • awareness raising / messages / campaigns.

Think about what will be interesting to your supporters.

Museums, galleries and cultural organisations in particular make good use of digital advent calendars to share gems from their collections. Take a look at the Horniman Museum’s calendar on instagram or National Library of Scotland’s #cartogradvent.

Some council’s are doing calendars too. This comms2point0 post from Merton Council explains how they are using their collection.

How technical should you go?

A simple approach is to just share an image on each new day via social media. This method works well if you are an organisation who has beautiful or inspiring images or a collection to showcase. Or have used Canva or equivalent to illustrate quotes.

There have been many more gif-based calendars this year. See this example from Community Christmas.

Video-based calendars and interactive websites are rarer. Even more unusual is the offline calendar. See Folkstone’s Living Advent Calendar.

Top tips

To build traction over the period, include a short specific hashtag such as AbbreviationOfYourOrgNameXmas16 so #THxmas16 or #BlissAdvent as above. This means people can explore previous days as the month progresses.

Include a link so people can find out more or take an action. If not done, this creates a dead-end. The calendar becomes a nice-to-have thing rather than something which drives traffic or action. People are likely to share these types of images so you have the potential to reach new audiences who might not know about you.

Ideas for next year

Get some inspiration for next year. Take a look at my collections of beautiful nonprofit advent calendars – Storify from 2016 and Storify from Christmas 2015.

Your tips

Spotted any good nonprofit advent calendars? Have you run one yourself? Was it worth the effort? Do you have any top tips? I’d love to hear from you.

Thanks to UK Fundraising for featuring my Storify in their article about charities’ digital advent calendars 2016.