January’s charity content highlights

Come out from underneath your desk / duvet and catch up with some of the latest creative charity content.

L-R Dave the Parkinsons Worm, contactless giving Zurich Insurance post, Street Support video, National Lottery gif

Innovation

Cancer Research are continuing their trend of using World Cancer Day (this Saturday – 4 February) to launch new uses for contactless fundraising. Ten ‘smart benches’ across two London boroughs will take £2 donations.

Are you planning to look in to contactless fundraising in 2017? NSPCC recently announced impressive results of their contactless fundraising and many other organisations are using it too. I gathered some examples of contactless giving in my blog post for Zurich Insurance and spoke to Haven House Children’s Hospice who are running trials at the moment.

Not sure what the technical term for this is but the National Lottery did a very smart bit of Twittering by launching this 7second video and inviting people to RT it ‘for a surprise’. The surprise was a personalised video, with the RTers’ Twitter profile image in a gold frame, with the words ‘National Treasure’ underneath. Nice! This was similar to a thanks reply from Save the Children I got in December.

National Lottery video of interesting doors / walls

Today it is Time to Talk Day (#timetotalk). Why not use Time to Change’s template to make your own graphic?

Time to Change's interactive graphic maker

Good reads

If you get a moment, don’t forget to fill in the Charity Digital Skills Survey which is open until 17 February.

And follow #smex17 on Monday if you are not going to the Social Media Exchange in person.

Re-brands / new websites / charity content

Action for Children's error message - cheeky boy with magnifying glass

To brighten your day

Meme of badly drawn pictures 'pasted' on top of a video of Donald Trump's policy signings

What have you seen?

What have been your charity content highlights from January? Do share! I’d love to hear from you.

#firstfiver – a democratic viral fundraiser

Selection of #firstfiver images from twitter

I have been watching the spread of the #firstfiver campaign since it started just under two weeks ago. It has been great to see how many organisations have joined in with this very simple idea.

Unlike other viral fundraisers (such as #nomakeupselfie which I have blogged about before) this was not connected to a particular cause. It also didn’t feature a complicated or strenuous ask (such as the Ice Bucket Challenge or the current #22PushUpChallenge).

Instead it was simple and easy to ask. And simple and easy for supporters to join in with.

Examples

If you haven’t come across it yet, look at my storify showing the spread of the campaign and how different charities have responded.

It includes examples from small charities such as Trinity Hosice, Harrogate Easier Living Project (HELP), The UK Sepsis Trust, Freedom from Torture and Make Lunch. And large ones including War Child UK, the Children’s Society and Sue Ryder.

Images, videos, thank yous and shopping lists showing the difference a £5 donation could make, all help to make a request stand out.

#firstfiver Storify – showing tips and examples

Get involved

If your organisation hasn’t joined in yet, it is not too late. The hashtag is still going strong and many people still haven’t had a new £5 note yet.

Share your views

Have you seen any good examples that I have missed? Any particularly humourous or creative or persuasive posts?

Has your organisation had (m)any donations? How easy was it for your organisation to join in with this campaign?

Have you made a donation yourself?

Please do comment, I’d love to hear from you.

April Fools’, digital disruption and more good reads

Lots of useful posts and campaigns in this week after Easter. Here’s a round-up.

Projection of data / code on big black screen

Small charities

Fundraising

Big campaigns

Tweet from @theplarchers who use PlayMobile characters to illustrate Archer's storylines

Radio 4’s long-running soap The Archers hit the headlines this week with the climax of their domestic violence storyline. After the programme on Sunday night it was trending for four hours with 20,000 tweets. The JustGiving page set up by a listener to raise money for Refuge hit its £100k target a few days later and helplines are reporting a 20% increase in calls.

Greenpeace April Fool - Floaty McFloatface

I missed April Fools’ Day this year. It was good to be able to catch up via 5 great charity April Fools 2016 and a round-up of charity April Fools 2016.

Digital disruptions

demo of Facebook's automatic alt text

  • Both Facebook and Twitter launched alt text solutions for images this week. Great news for blind and partially sighted users as digital increasingly becomes based on image rather than text. Wired wrote that Facebook uses AI to automatically apply the alt text whereas Twitter relies on the tweeter to apply it manually assuming they are using a smartphone and have checked the accessibility features. One blind blogger welcomed the news.
  • This transcript of a McKinsey podcast on digital strategy talked about the economics of disruption and the challenges for business identifying potential attacks. Useful reading for those working on their digital strategies.

What have I missed?

What did you read this week? Please share in the comments.

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Social media and charity content – this week’s highlights

My week started with the Social Media Exchange. It was a packed day of inspiring stories and practical tips. If you missed the event, do check out the storify.

Other things I have read this week:

And examples of creative content:

Covers of Mills&Boon books featuring disabled characters

And finally to counter-act their negative coverage, Age UK decided to launch #ProudtobeAgeUK.

Messages of support from Age UK

Feels like it has been a full-on week, especially with charities so much in the news. If you spotted other good reads or creative content, please share via the comments box.

Have a good weekend.

 

5 digital comms tips for hospices

Hospices are amazing places but often their digital content is missing something. Websites, email and social media tend to be dominated by their excellent community fundraising rather than telling the story of what they do and making an ask. I have been working on a few projects with hospices recently. Here are some great examples and my top tips for hospice comms.

1. Set the tone

A strong and clear strapline or prominent sentence can help set the scene on your homepage or more widely across your site and social media. In a few words you can warmly bring people in, explain what you do and set the tone for your hospice. (Like this example from Severn Hospice – the statement “Behind every family we help is a huge caring team and hundreds of kind supporters who make it all possible” appears prominently on every page of their website.)

Severn Hospice - "Behind every family we help is a huge caring team and hundreds of kind supporters who make it all possible"

Statements like this can be difficult to write as each word and the tone of voice counts. Look at what other hospices do to get some inspiration (such as the example from Peace Hospice Care below). Then brainstorm key words and phrases that you want to use. Test out your draft statements with colleagues and the people you support to get some feedback. Once finalised, you can use this statement in lots of different ways across your different channels.

Peace Hospice statement: Peace Hospice Care offers excellent all-round care for people across South West Hertfordshire with a life limiting illness

2. Show what you do

Hospices mainly use social media to drum up supporters for events and fundraising activities. Don’t miss the chance to use it to show the detail of what you do. Short statements, graphics and photos showing your work can be very effective as these two tweets from Haven House Children’s Hospice show.

2 tweets from Haven House Children's Hospice showing their work

And use social media to dispel general myths about hospices (as shown in this tweet from Sue Ryder).

Sue Ryder tweet

Do you have a ‘why support us’ page in your fundraising section? Supporters may need more persuading than a ‘please donate’ ask and information in your ‘about us’ section might be tailored for friends, family and carers rather than new supporters. A ‘why support us’ page can give you a space to explain what you do and how much it costs. Here is a good  example from St Joseph’s Hospice.

3. Tell a story

How do you tell the story of the people you support and the wider story of your organisation? Case studies are widely used but often feel quite formulaic. Getting people to read a carefully crafted but devastating story in 800 words can be hard. About us pages covering your history and founder can also be very dry.

Reframe your case studies as stories written by the subject (like Norma’s story from Severn Hospice or Margaret’s story from Hospice in the Weald). These sound more authentic and engaging. You could still write the story yourself based on what they have told you but write it in their voice and with their signoff.

Many charities invite their users to write about their experience. For example, the mental health charity Mind have blog posts written by users. Their ‘in our own words’ section includes users’ #mentalhealthselfies and #drawmylife videos. They have produced comprehensive guidelines to help people write for them.

Many of the people you support will be too ill to share their story and it won’t be appropriate to ask. Are there other ways you can tell a story? Could your volunteers, nurses or care staff contribute? Could you tell a story from the perspective of a mascot or piece of equipment (such as a teddy bear, bench in the garden or the tea machine)? Being creative can engage readers and lighten the tone (as these tweets from Arthur Rank Hospice show).

Arthur Rank Hospice tweets showing Arthur Bear in action

Your stories should end with an ask (eg ‘please help us to help people like Steve’) or at least a link to ‘find out more about our services’. This is so often overlooked. People reading an emotional story may want to do something to help. Make it easy for them or nudge them to do so. If it doesn’t feel right, test it out for a month or so. If it doesn’t work, take it off or change the wording.

See more about: Storytelling.

4. Use photos

Photos are key to a good story. They invite the reader in and give an indication of what the story will be about. Poor quality or unclear photos can put off a reader. Stock photos of healthcare can stick out like a sore thumb. Photos of your own setting, staff and patients are much more authentic and help bring your organisation to life. What is your housestyle for photos?

Photos can be shocking, moving or funny in the right context. They don’t have to be professionally taken but should tell a story. These lovely images from an Acorn’s Hospice story in a local paper are family-taken pictures.

Acorn's Hospice tweet - Alexis's story

Comment boards can be a very effective way of telling a story or getting a message across. They can be quick and easy to do. Try a simple statement such as these examples from Acorn’s Hospice (I give Acorns…. / Acorns gives me).

Acorn's gives me / I give Acorn's comment boards

Or more emotional like St Joseph’s “I want to be remembered for….” pictures. (NB St Joseph’s have lots of beautiful photos on their website.)

St Joseph's photo of a man holding a sign saying "I wan to be remembered for..."

5. Use video

Video is perhaps the most impactful tool you can use. A 2minute film showing what you do can be more effective than pages and pages of written content. Think about the stories you can tell through film. What are the key messages you want to get across? Who is the audience for your film? What do you want to persuade them to do after watching? How can you use video alongside your other communications?

Video has the potential to show very moving stories. Some hospice stories have been very hard-hitting. It can be risky to produce a film which is very upsetting as you can risk alienating your audience and community. Planning and editing a video should involve lots of questions about the sensitivities of the subject and viewer.

There are lots of inspiring examples to look at to help you think about how you could use video. I love this film of volunteer Elaine talking about her experience of Hospice in the Weald.

Elaine's story of volunteering for 17 years

This video from Haven House Children’s Hospice is upsetting but very powerful. It has had over 950 views. And this film from Princess Alice Hospice is a simple slideshow of photos showing what they do.

There are lots of practical tips about video in this post by Jude Habib: Bring your story to life through video. Find out more about YouTube’s charity help including how to apply overlays and donate buttons.

Other tips

  • Do you include JustTextGiving details on your donation page? Willowbrook Hospice’s donation page starts with the SMS details, then list other methods including charity shop donations.
  • What does your housestyle say about how you talk about death and dying? What terminology is appropriate for your organisation and audience? Do you talk about it in a clear way or skirt around the topic? Do you use euphemisms? Is this the language used by your audience? Do you use a different style for different channels?
  • Are you using terminology which alienates your audience? Are you sure that everyone knows what terms like palliative care, multi-professional teams or even life-limiting conditions mean?
  • Storify can be a powerful way to document an event or your work around a particular theme. See: Content curation.
  • Keep up with what other hospices are doing. Watching out for new fundraising methods will give you new ideas. For example, St Joseph’s have a sponsor a nurse programme is very well put together and St Helena Hospice run a big-bucket-a-thon.

Share your tips

What tips or examples would you add? I’d love to hear about your experience. What works well for you? What did you try and then scrap? Please share using the comments box below.

Can I help?

I help charities and non-profits with their content. Whether you are looking for training for the team, copywriting or some input into your content strategy, please get in touch.

See also Legacy Fundraising – tips for persuasive and engaging web copy.

Bumper digital round-up – April 2015

It’s been another bumper week of useful posts and links so I’ve collected them together for your viewing pleasure (and mine).

On my radar

CitizensAdvice1

Social media

Charity campaigns

UpYourFriendly

Of course the big campaign of the week has been all the activity around the Nepal earthquake. There’s been so much, too big to reflect on here but the tweets from @TomAllen who is out there and works for ActionAid have really stood out.

nepaltweets

Forthcoming events

And I am re-running my Content Strategy course at Media Trust on 14 May.

And finally….

OrkneyLibrary

What did I miss?

What’s on your radar? What did I miss? Please do share in the comments or via Twitter.

#GivingTuesday – the first year of UK activity

On Tuesday 2nd December my timeline was filled with all sorts of messages tagged with #GivingTuesday. It was brilliant to see Twitter awash with fundraising, volunteering, other asks and thank you’s. Many were simple, others were moving or creative. If you missed it all, there are two great Storifys packed with examples. Tennyson Insurance and GivingTuesdayUK have both curated some of the social media activity around the event.

Tweet promoting GivingTuesday with a blackboard with Black Friday and Cyber Monday crossed out

If you missed all the hype about the event you can read the background about it on the GivingTuesdayUK website.

A creative day

It’s really interesting to look at the different ways organisations used the day to spread their message. Many used it as a chance to try something new and creative. Organisations used powerful images, videos and storytelling to share their message.

There were thousands of #UNselfies.

RNIB’s #PassTheParcel stood out as a fun game using sefies and tagging.

And Sue Ryder used Buzzfeed to promote their Secret Santa.

This great UKFundraising’s article on 6 ways charities made the most of Giving Tuesday looks at some of the trends. And this Storify from Project Scotland shows all the activity around their own campaign.

#ThankYouWednesday

The day that followed was tagged #ThankYouWednesday. It was the first step to building a longer relationships with new supporters. Many charities (but fewer than those who embraced #GivingTuesday) shared a simple thank you and welcomed new followers / donors / volunteers / emailnewsletter subscribers. Here’s a Giving Tuesday UK Storify of the thank you’s.

#GivingTuesday 2015?

Hopefully people will reflect on the day and in time share data about the impact of the event. The Twitter graphs and Twitter analysis by Crimson Hexagon show that there was a lot of noise about the event – 30,000 UK tweets.

It remains to be seen how this translated into donations of money, time and action. Civil Society’s article cites healthy percentage increases in donations via JustGiving, JustTextGiving and Visa. Hopefully positive results from individual charities will inspire those who didn’t get involved yesterday, to join in in 2015.

If you did join in this year, what will you do differently / better next year? What will you build in to your everyday communications as a result of taking risks this year? What skills or resources do you need to develop a stronger ask? There are lots of useful guides, courses and conferences to give you inspiration. In particular, don’t miss the Social Media Exchange in February.

What did you think?

Did you donate yesterday? Do you think #GivingTuesday is a good idea? Did it make a difference to your charity?