#YouMadeItHappen day

Do you know about #YouMadeItHappen day on Monday 19 November? The aim of the day, led by NCVO and supported by Charity Comms, Small Charity Coalition, FSI, IoF and ACEVO, is to thank supporters and show the difference charities and supporters make together.

photo of street art - john lennon's face next to the words Help, I need somebody, help, not just anybody

Think of it as a free pass to talk about the impact you make. And a chance to show supporters the bigger picture – how their involvement (through fundraising, campaigning, volunteering etc) made all the difference.

Many charities don’t use social media enough to thank their supporters or talk about the impact they make or show the detail of the work they do. So this is a good opportunity with the excuse of joining in with a shared hashtag / campaign to make it easier.

Get involved

Think about how you could use the hashtag and make it work for your organisation. There are no rules for the day. Here are some ideas.

  • Share a handful of interesting stories about particular people who have gone the extra mile to support you. Have they done something unusual or impressive or tough? What did their support achieve? Do you have data about impact you could use?
  • Has a staff member or team achieved something particularly important which has had a big impact? This could be a good opportunity to talk about it.
  • Are there people you could thank individually? Or an activity which lots of people did which you could feature?
  • Share some detail about your impact. Focus on headlines from the last year or just a month or week. Or show a day in the life. Or show the impact on one person. Statistics show volume, stories bring impact to life.
  • Be more creative – how can you make the messages you want to share, extra engaging? Could you create a quiz, write a poem or make a short video?
  • Think about the action you want people to take and how you want them to feel. You don’t want them to think that it is ‘job done’ and you don’t need their support any more. You want supporters to feel proud of how they have contributed, happy to be part of a community of people like them who have collectively made a difference. You want them to do it again. Or if they haven’t supported, you want them to do so.

Examples

Spend some time playing around with the hashtag. How does it work with your tone of voice and the things you want to say? I have had a few tries here.

sample tweet - last half term, we served 76 children with hot meals. Thank you to everyone who donated money or time. #YouMadeItHappen

sample tweet - Did you know.... Last Christmas 125 people took part in our reverse advent calendar scheme. Local families had a happier Christmas because of the food and toys donated. Thank you. #YouMadeItHappen

sample tweet - This year our supporter Mo ran five marathons for us. He raised a staggering £10,465 which will pay for our helpline for a month. Thank you Mo! #YouMadeItHappen

There are other suggestions in NCVO’s #YouMadeItHappen day blog post and a few tweets doing the rounds already (eg Sussex Community Rail).

Practicalities

  • Capitalise the words within the # (ie #YouMadeItHappen rather than #youmadeithappen) so it is easy to read.
  • Include images or graphics to illustrate impact.
  • Use words which are emotive / powerful.
  • Use the hashtag early in the day to get the most out of it.
  • Be prepared for negative comments – how might you deal with people challenging what you are saying?
  • Think about how messages may overlap or complement comms you have planned for #GivingTuesday the following week. You don’t want to distract from activity on #GivingTuesday.
  • Think about how to connect and document content from the day so your work doesn’t get missed. For example, post your messages as a thread on Twitter – all at once or over the course of the day. Package your tweets up into a Moment afterwards so you can refer to them in the future.

Keep an eye on the hashtag on the day. See how others are using it and join the conversation.

Further reading

What do you think?

NCVO's tweet promoting the hashtag

Is this day a good idea? Are you going to get involved?

I’d love to know what you think. Please comment or tweet.

 

 

Advertisements

Digital round-up – October 2018

Highlights this month: big hashtags, user-generated content, AI, voice tech, digital skills and more….

The nights are setting in and seasonal content is upon us. October is a very busy month of awareness days. There was lots of great content launched. Pop the kettle on and catch up.

close up of 50s metal toy robot

How to use: Pick and choose links to read, or open in new tabs for later. Or bookmark this post. Even better, subscribe and get future round-ups direct to your inbox.

Content

10 October was #WorldMentalHealthDay, #WorldHomelessnessDay and #HousingDay. I have never seen my list of trending topics look like this for an hour, let alone all day. The trending hashtags and topics were consistently related to these issues. Nothing else got a look-in all day.

all 10 trending topics relate to social issues - a rare sight

There was some amazing content including:

Gallery of faces with white writing painted on them sharing insights into their mental health

Also this month:

screenshot of Halloween Twitter Moment

Twitter takeover of the month: CoppaFeel’s Kris Hallenger / @nhs. Kris who has been living with stage 4 breast cancer since 2009, talked about treatments and good health.

Comms

Digital – strategy, design, culture

Fundraising

graphic for Gift Aid awareness day - £560m in gift aid is unclaimed every year

People

And finally….

Your recommendations

What did you read, watch or launch this month? Please add your links in the comments.

Can I help you?

Get in touch if I can help you with content planning, training or strategy. I work with charities of all shapes and sizes. I can help give your comms or digital processes a healthcheck and ideas injection.

——

Did you miss September’s round-up? Catch up with more good reads!

Go outside your echo chamber, that’s where the reward is

First-hand stories, conversations, performances are very powerful to listen to. To have real impact they need to reach people who can make a change. The message from this year’s Being the Story was that we need to take these stories out of the echo chamber.

9 images from Being the Story 2018

Following Being the Story 2016, I wrote about the power of empathy as a listener, how hearing a first-hand story can change hearts and minds. In 2017, I wrote how first-hand storytelling can be a cathartic process for the person telling their story.

This year the message was that lived-experience stories can drive change.

The impact of stories

During the day, we heard from people with lived experience who have been telling their stories in different ways and in different places. These stories reached the media, policy-makers, funders and other decision-makers. The stories were not just heard. They didn’t only generate empathy. In some cases, they led to being part of bigger change making.

For example, this year we heard how:

  • Simeon Moore from DatsTV has become a go-to speaker for the media about street violence since he appeared on stage in 2017. This profile has meant that policy-makers involve him in their plans
  • Caroline Kennedy is using her experience of poverty in Glasgow as a commissioner with the Poverty and Inequality Commission that advises the Scottish government on child poverty issues, sharing the personal stories of parents, from those with children with learning disabilities, to asylum seekers, all families experiencing poverty
  • Steve Arnott from Beats Bus took a chance and trusted film-maker Sean McAllister to make a film about him which has had a general release and will be shown on BBC2 later this year. This has given him a platform to speak about poverty but also build big plans for Beats Bus.
  • The Empathy Museum have taken their Mile in My Shoes series to the NHS Confederation Conference and Houses of Parliament so that decision-makers there listen and understand those first-hand experiences, and hopefully make changes for the better.

A call to action

‘Go outside your echo chamber, that’s where the reward is’ said trans activist Charlie Craggs who takes her pop-up nail bar round the country to generate conversations.

What can you do to help people with lived-experience to tell their stories? How can you help them to find new audiences away from the charity bubble? How can you help them to join with others to tell a bigger story? What can you do to connect them with the media and decision-makers so they are listened to and involved in finding the solutions?

Take inspiration from the sounddelivery team who work tirelessly behind the scenes to train their Being the Story speakers to tell their stories on the day and beyond. They connect them with other people working in similar areas. They put them forward to journalists.

sounddelivery keep themselves out of the story. Your organisation is not the story. The cause or issue and the lived-experience of it, is the story. Find people with lived experience and let them speak.

Being the Story 2018

Every single one of the speakers and performers from this year’s event was brilliant. Get a flavour of the day in the official Wakelet from the event.

Read more responses in the blog posts written about the event so far:

You can also look at the #BeingTheStory hashtag and read the programme from the event.

 

 

 

 

Are you going to #BeingTheStory 2018?

There’s now just a week to go until this year’s Being the Story event in London.

Sounddelivery have put together another amazing line-up of people who will tell their stories in creative and powerful ways. You really don’t want to miss this.

4 speakers from Being the Story 2017

Why should I go?

The event will be moving, thought-provoking and inspiring.

It will make you think about your use of case studies and storytelling.

It will open your eyes to different experiences and views. Get a flavour from previous Being the Story events:

Get tickets

Book your place today! Friday 19 October, Conway Hall near Holborn in London.

Hope to see you there.

Digital round-up – September 18

Highlights this month: AI, ethics, the Human search engine, and hope.

September is a busy month of awareness days and a good time to launch new brands or websites before the noise of seasonal fundraising. Pop the kettle on and catch up with some content and good reads you might have missed.

vintage toy yellow citron car on a fluffy blue carpet

How to use: Pick and choose links to read, or open in new tabs for later. Or bookmark this post. Even better, subscribe and get future round-ups direct to your inbox.

Content

Still from Wayback video. Two older ladies using cardboard VR viewer, open mouths - wow!

screenshot of 4 human search engine images

There were new websites from Sue Ryder, and NPC this month. Plus new brands from National Autistic Society and RNIB who created a short video about the change..

Comms

Digital

Fundraising

In case you missed it, I wrote this about donor experience / in-memory fundraising.

People

Hope… and where to find it – read this moving post by Kate Carroll to help remind yourself why your comms / information / fundraising work, really matters.

black and white photo of hands holidng a piece of paper with the word 'hope' written

And finally….

Your recommendations

What did you read, watch or launch this month? Please add your links in the comments.

Can I help you?

Get in touch if I can help you with content planning, training or strategy. I work with charities of all shapes and sizes. I can help give your comms or digital processes a healthcheck, skills review and ideas injection.

——

Did you miss August’s round-up? Catch up with more good reads!

Check your donor experience / in-memory fundraising

How do your donor experiences make people feel? Have you created an online giving process which is easy to use and says thank you in an appropriate way? In-memory fundraising has to be particularly sensitive to donor’s feelings.

Here’s an example of how easy it is to get it wrong and a reminder to regularly check your donor experience.

Careless comms

A couple of weeks ago I got the news that a school friend took his own life. His family asked for donations to a specific mental health charity instead of flowers at the funeral. On Monday (which was World Suicide Prevention Day) I made an online donation via JustGiving in his memory to the local branch. The charity did not have a ‘donate in memory’ function on its website and I spent 20 minutes going round the houses to find how to make a one-off online donation.

My donation on JustGiving - 'Donation in memory of my school friend, who recently took his own life aged 43. #WorldSuicidePreventionDay"

The next day I got the following thank you email via JustGiving.

It was careless that they spelt my name wrong (it does happen all the time but it is still annoying) but it was the lack of care they put into the response which was disappointing. The tone of voice felt inappropriate given the message I had left with my donation (saying that the donation was in memory of my friend who had taken his own life). I would have expected more care from a mental health charity.

Message says- You're amazing! Thank you Madeline (spent wrong) from Team. x

I put these mistakes down to two oversights.

1. Because there was no in-memory option on their website, I had to make a standard donation, so was thanked in the standard way. The standard subject line (You’re amazing) would have been fine if I had run a marathon or held a cake sale but this was a donation in memory. I wasn’t amazing, I was doing a normal thing in response to a shocking event. I am sure they wouldn’t have used this line if they had created a separate donor journey for in-memory gifts.

2. Maybe the person who writes the thank you doesn’t read the messages left with the donations. If so, it is risky to use a jolly tone of voice and add a kiss at the end of your message. (The message says: Thank you Madeline from Team [charity name] x.)

Check your donation journey

This isn’t intended to be a name and shame but as a real-life example to remind you how easy it is to get it wrong and a call to action to check your donation journeys. It is easy for mistakes to creep in, especially if you are using multiple platforms or have periodically added different online payment options without seeing the whole picture.

But your donors don’t care about this. They just want an easy process to give. They want an appropriate and timely thank you.

Check yourself – be your own mystery shopper. Put yourselves in the shoes of different donors, get your user-journeys right. Think about their motivations and feelings. Check your thank you processes. For example:

  • Are your automatic responses, appropriate in all situations? Avoid exclamation marks and kisses!
  • Have you got the right pathways for people to give in different ways?
  • Do you have an appropriate tone of voice, especially when talking about sensitive issues?
  • How do you respond to personal messages left with donations? Have you developed standard messages you can modify?

Don’t give bad donor experiences.

In-memory donations

Check your in-memory options. Do you have a separate page or donation journey for in-memory gifts? Most charities have these and offer lots of different options. For example, alongside a link to make a on-off donation (via their own online donation process or third parties such as JustGiving), many provide envelopes to take donations at funerals, links to set up fundraising pages or tribute funds, or schemes for bigger donations.

There are lots of examples of hospices and health-related causes who are good at in-memory fundraising. For example, look at Demelza Hospice Care for Children, British Lung Foundation and Yorkshire Air Ambulance. Non-health organisations recognise that their supporters turn to them at these times too so have similar pages. For example, look at Shelter, Family Action and Freedom from Torture.

screenshot of Freedom from Torture page

In all of these examples, tone of voice is warm, gentle, respectful and positive. As with online legacy content, organisations that do it well, make you feel like they are sitting alongside you as you do something good out of a tough situation.

Each gives an opportunity to make a one-off donation in memory, with most offering an option to leave a message.

A donation in-memory is different from a standard on-off donation. It needs processing in a different way. Are you doing yours right?

Further reading

See also, my top tips about online legacy content.

Your comments

How does your in-memory fundraising measure up? Have you got any top tips or examples to share? I’d love to hear from you. Add your views in the comments.

 

Subscribe

Sign up to receive my blog updates by email. Add your details to the ‘Get this blog direct to your in-box’ box! Here is a flavour about the things I write about – themes and top posts.  Thanks for reading this one.

Digital round-up – August

Highlights this month: ethical marketing, voice search, digital evolution and shopping with a giant fundraising cheque.

It’s back to school / work time. If you were off in August or just head-down because everyone else was, here’s some great content and good reads to catch up with.

4 plastic owls (blue, yellow, pink, green) wear glasses in a shop window display

How to use: Pick and choose links to read, or open in new tabs for later. Or bookmark this post. Even better, subscribe and get future round-ups direct to your inbox.

Content

Still from Scope's video. Shows people walking with giant banner saying 'rights for disabled people'

Here are some useful reminders about how images can reinforce negative stereotypes. I spotted a call for #NoMoreWrinklyHands and an article shared by Time to Change about the rise of the head clutcher image to illustrate mental health stories. >> Review and improve your use of images.

Comms

Digital

Fundraising

Alzheimer’s Research UK show some love for a giant fundraising cheque. Here we see it in action at the station, in a shop and on a train. A cheque picture with personality! >> Here are more examples of alternatives to cheque line-up pictures in my post Just say no to giant cheques.

Tweet from Alzheimer's Research UK showing staff members out and about with a giant cheque. At the station. At the supermarket.

People

Have you booked your ticket for Being the Story in October? Here’s more about last year’s inspirational event. Being the Story 2017 – carthartic and powerful storytelling. Don’t miss 2018.

And finally….

Blue Peter explain the world wide web – from the BBC archive,1995.

list of links of blue link text - how web pages looked in 1995

Your recommendations

What did you read, watch or launch this month? Please add your links in the comments.

Can I help you?

Get in touch if I can help you with digital copywriting, content planning, training or strategy. I work with charities of all shapes and sizes. I can help give your comms or digital processes a healthcheck and ideas injection.

——

Did you miss July’s round-up? Catch up with more good reads!